It's not how much we give but how much love we put into giving.

Ways to give

Plan-It Life invites you to join us in helping prepare our youth to reach their greatest potential. Every contribution, regardless of the gift level, is critically important to our work. And we take our stewardship of your gift seriously. By making a gift, you enable Plan-It Life to serve even more youth. And you show them that there are generous individuals in the community who care about their success.

Your donations to Plan-It Life are used to provide for the youth in our homes.

The assurance of ongoing revenue from recurring gifts empowers Plan-It Life to reach more youth.

Give by Mail
Prefer to send a check?
 
Please include “Donation” on the memo section of your check and mail your check to:

6235 River Crest Drive Ste O, Riverside, California

Give by Phone
Please call us at (951) 653-7561.

Please have your credit, debit or electronic funds transfer information ready.

 

Your gift of your vehicle donation is appreciated

Proud Member of

Plan-It Life, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c)(3) residential treatment center for at-risk youth, ages 12 -18. Plan-It Life, Inc. was founded in 2001 by CEO/ Administrator Shelia C. Marshall -McLean, LMFT, a Clinical Psychotherapist with a passion for fostering growth and self-awareness in youth. Mrs. McLean envisioned a safe haven where abused and/or neglected teens could come to learn social skills, decision-making skills, improve their education, receive anger management and therapy, as well as assistance in transitioning into the next phase of their lives.

Vehicle Donation

THE GOALS

The Group Home provides diagnostic, assessment and stabilization services to teens. The program provides a safe environment to help residents stabilize problem behaviors that interfere with being successful. The program provides 24-hour residential care within guidelines of the group home licensed by the State of California. The program focuses on 

  1. Academics
  2. Self-discipline
  3.  Social skills development
  4. Life skills
  5. Decision making

Residents are expected to participate in planning their future and learn to take responsibility for their actions. 

The first goal is to provide food, shelter, clothing, and security

The second goal is to give the resident an opportunity to start over, within the guidelines of Title 22 and requirements by the county court system. 

The third goal is an assessment to complete a thorough evaluation of the resident’s past involvement in the system, on all levels, and provide through psychological assessment, psychiatric assessment, a psycho-social evaluation, and medical history. The evaluation will also include evaluating cognitive needs, and resident’s ambitions, strengths, and weaknesses. The evaluation will cover all areas from a psycho-social evaluation to independent living skills and hygiene.

The fourth goal is to provide basic instruction in social skills, self-esteem, trustworthiness, home and school rules and responsibilities, dealing with authority figures, dealing with problems, and interacting with others. The program provides instruction on relating to peers and adults, on how to gain friendships, how to deal with instruction, maintaining friendships, sharing and assisting others. It will provide basic instruction on understanding social situations, reviewing personality attributes how to get along with others in the community, everyday etiquette and activities. 

 

THE RESIDENTS

The residents, like all children, need:

  1. To be listened to
  2. Given valuable information that they can use to make decisions
  3. Given the language to express their feelings and opinions
  4. Develop positive coping skills
  5. To be taught living skills and social skills
  6. To take responsibility for their actions
  7. To learn to protect themselves 
  8. To learn to problem solve

It is our intent to provide the best care possible for the residents and, at the same time, assist them in gaining control of their behavior. 

THE PROGRAM

The program asks that residents participate in planning their futures and take responsibility for their lives. It is their life and they need to know how to plan it, how to decrease the struggle with power figures, and how to focus on developing their own social skills, intellectual skills, building autonomy, emancipation skills, vocational areas of interest, as well as spiritual needs. 

Protein Foods

What foods are in the Protein Foods Group?

*Data from choosemyplate.gov

All foods made from meat, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, eggs, processed soy products, nuts, and seeds are considered part of the Protein Foods Group. Beans and peas are also part of the Vegetable Group. 

Select a variety of protein foods to improve nutrient intake and health benefits, including at least 8 ounces of cooked seafood per week. Young children need less, depending on their age and calorie needs. The advice to consume seafood does not apply to vegetarians. Vegetarian options in the Protein Foods Group include beans and peas, processed soy products, and nuts and seeds. Meat and poultry choices should be lean or low-fat.

How much food from the Protein Foods Group is needed daily?

The amount of protein foods you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 2 and 6½ ounce-equivalents each day. Those who are very physically active may need more. Most Americans eat enough food from this group, but need to make leaner and more varied selections of these foods. Recommended daily amounts are shown in the table below.

 

*These amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.

What counts as an ounce-equivalent in the Protein Foods Group?

In general, 1 ounce of meat, poultry or fish, ¼ cup cooked beans, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter, or ½ ounce of nuts or seeds can be considered as 1 ounce-equivalent from the Protein Foods Group.

This table below lists specific amounts that count as 1 ounce-equivalent in the Protein Foods Group towards your daily recommended intake.


 

Dairy

What foods are included in the Dairy Group?

*Data from choosemyplate.gov

All fluid milk products and many foods made from milk that retain their calcium content, such as yogurt and cheese, are part of the Dairy Group. Calcium-fortified soymilk (soy beverage) is also included. Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium, such as cream cheese, cream, and butter, are not part of the Dairy Group.

How much food from the Dairy Group is needed daily?

The amount of dairy foods you need to eat depends on your age. The amount each person needs can vary between 2 and 3 cups each day. Those who are very physically active may need more. Recommended daily amounts are shown in the table below. 

 

 

What counts as a cup in the Dairy Group?

In general, 1 cup of milk, yogurt, or soymilk (soy beverage), 1 ½ ounces of natural cheese, or 2 ounces of processed cheese can be considered as 1 cup from the Dairy Group. When choosing dairy, fat-free and low-fat dairy are good options. The table below lists specific amounts that count as 1 cup in the Dairy Group towards your daily recommended intake. 

 

Grain

What foods are in the Grains Group?

*Data from choosemyplate.gov

Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, breakfast cereals, grits, and tortillas are examples of grain products. Foods such as popcorn, rice, and oatmeal are also included in the Grains Group. 
Grains are divided into 2 subgroups: Whole Grains and Refined Grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel ― the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples of whole grains include whole-wheat flour, bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins. Some examples of refined grain products are white flour, de-germed cornmeal, white bread, and white rice.
 
Most refined grains are enriched. This means certain B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid) and iron are added back after processing. Fiber is not added back to enriched grains. Check the ingredient list on refined grain products to make sure that the word “enriched” is included in the grain name. Some food products are made from mixtures of whole grains and refined grains.
 

How many grain foods are needed daily?

The amount of grain foods you need to eat depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 3 and 8 ounce-equivalents each day — at least half of the grains you eat should be whole grains. Those who are very physically active may need more. Recommended daily amounts are listed in the table below. Most Americans consume enough grains, but few are whole grains.

Note: Click on the top row to expand the table. If you are on a mobile device, you may need to turn your phone to see the full table. 


*These amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.
What counts as an ounce-equivalent (oz-equiv) of grains?
 

In general, 1 slice of bread, 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal, or ½ cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal can be considered as 1 ounce-equivalent from the Grains Group. The table below lists specific amounts that count as 1 ounce-equivalent of grains towards your daily recommended intake. In some cases the number of ounce-equivalents for common portions are also shown.

Note: Click on the top row to expand the table. If you are on a mobile device, you may need to turn your phone to see the full table. 


Vegetables

What foods are in the Vegetable 

*Data from choosemyplate.gov

How many vegetables are needed?

The amount of vegetables you need to eat depends on your age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 1 and 3 cups each day. Those who are very physically active may need more. Recommended total daily amounts and recommended weekly amounts from each vegetable subgroup are shown in the two tables below.


*These amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.

Vegetable subgroup recommendations are given as amounts to eat WEEKLY. It is not necessary to eat vegetables from each subgroup daily. However, over a week, try to consume the amounts listed from each subgroup as a way to reach your daily intake recommendation.

 

 

What counts as a cup of vegetables?

In general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens can be considered as 1 cup from the Vegetable Group. The table below lists specific amounts that count as 1 cup of vegetables (in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are also shown) towards your recommended intake.


Fruit

What foods are in the Fruit Group?

*Data from choosemyplate.gov

Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

How much fruit is needed daily?

The amount of fruit you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity. The amount each person needs can vary between 1 and 2 cups each day. Those who are very physically active may need more. Recommended daily amounts are shown in the table below.


*These amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs.

What counts as a cup of fruit?

In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group. This table below shows specific amounts that count as 1 cup of fruit (in some cases equivalents for ½ cup are also shown) towards your daily recommended intake. 


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